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United Kingdom (Scotland)

National policies covering the care and support of people with dementia and their carers

Background information

Where people with dementia receive care and support

The following table provides estimates of the number of people with dementia living at home, in various types of residential care and in hospitals or psychiatric institutions.

Place of residence

 

YES or NO

Estimated number/

Additional information

At home

Yes

An estimated 60%

In a care home (type not specified)

Yes

An estimated 40%

In hospitals, special wards or medical units

Yes

 

In psychiatric establishments

Yes

 

A detailed breakdown regarding the number of people living at home and in residential care does not exist. As stated in the above table, there are an estimated 60% of people with dementia living at home and 40% living in care homes (including different forms of residential care and in long-term hospital care).  This estimate is backed-up by the most recent care home research on dementia prevalence and cognitive problems in residents. 

Approximately 90% of residents in care homes have dementia or cognitive difficulties (Lithgow et al., 2012).  The number of people in care homes for older people is approximately 33,600 (ISD 2012). ISD is the statistical NHS information service.

Figures relating to the ratio of staff to residents in various care establishments are not available.

The organisation of care and support for people with dementia

The overall organisation of care and support

While some aspects of welfare provision are reserved matters for the UK Government, the provision of Health and Social Care is devolved to the Scottish Parliament. Most aspects of the social security system, which makes provision for a range of social security benefits, are the responsibility of the Department for Work and Pensions, a department of the UK Government. This includes a range of social security benefits, which provide financial assistance, such as state retirement pensions, disability benefits, and benefits for people of working age who are unable to work due to unemployment, caring commitments, or through illness or disability. Some aspects of social security are devolved to the Scottish Parliament.

Overall responsibility for health and social care in Scotland sits with the Scottish Government. The current 14 Scottish health boards and 32 Scottish local authorities have respective statutory responsibilities for the health and social care in Scotland. 

The Scottish Government has recently introduced a bill to change the way in which health and social care is arranged in Scotland. The Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Bill was introduced to Parliament on 28 May 2013. The Bill sets out a legal framework for the integration of adult health and social care in Scotland and is focussed on improving outcomes for people by providing consistency in the quality of services, ensuring people are not unnecessarily delayed in hospital and maintaining independence by creating integrated health and social care services that support people to stay safely at home for longer.

The legal framework for the organisation of care and support

Scotland has an established and complex legal framework for the provision of care and support, particularly in relation to care at home and in care homes.  

Social care and support in Scotland is accessed through an assessment of needs. Under the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968 local authorities have a general duty to promote social welfare by making available advice, guidance and assistance to“persons in need”.  The Act also creates a duty on local authorities to undertake an assessment of need for individuals who appear to have social care needs. Local Authorities manage their resources by applying eligibility criteria thresholds.  Where a person has assessed eligible needs, which meet the eligibility criteria thresholds, the local authority has a statutory duty to meet those needs.  Under the Chronically Sick & Disabled Persons Act 1970 local authorities have a duty to provide services that meet assessed eligible needs.

Individuals with eligible assessed needs can choose to take a direct payment in lieu of services in order to arrange their own care and support however, take up is relatively low.  The Scottish Government is introducing self-directed support legislation to ensure that individuals have greater access to a range of choices about how they arrange their own care and support.

The Social Work (Scotland) Act allows local authorities to charge a person receiving care at home services and to determine their own charging policy for non-residential care services. Charges must be reasonable and practical.

Where a person has assessed needs which may best be met within a care home, local authorities have a duty to provide or secure the provision of residential accommodation under the National Assistance Act 1948.

Where a person is unable to meet the cost of care home accommodation local authorities are obliged to carry out a financial assessment of the residents ability pay. A national legal framework (National Assistance (Assessment of Resources) Regulations 1992) set out how local authorities carry out the financial assessment.  The framework sets out how a person’s income and capital (including land or property owned by the resident) should be treated in order to determine the contribution he/she makes towards the cost of a care home.   

The Community Care and Health (Scotland) Act 2002 introduced free personal and nursing care in Scotland for people age 65 or over.  The act requires that local authorities do not charge for any care and support services which can be defined as personal or nursing care.

For people receiving care at home this means local authorities cannot charge people aged 65 or over for any personal or nursing care services although they can charge for eligible non personal care services. People assessed as needing care in a care home receive a minimum contribution, from April 2013, of £166 for personal care per week and £75 for nursing care per week (if assessed as also needing nursing care), towards the non-accommodation costs of a care home place.

How specific aspects of care and support are addressed

Standards of care and support

The Standards of Care for Dementia in Scotland relate to everyone with a diagnosis of dementia in Scotland regardless of where they live, their age, the supports they receive or the severity of their illness. This includes younger people, people with a learning disability and people with rare types of dementia. They apply to people living in their own homes, care homes or hospitals, especially general hospitals. These standards have been developed to help people with dementia and their carers understand their rights, and how these rights can help make sure that they receive the support they need to stay well, safe and listened to.

The standards are underpinned by two main sources of information. The first is the Charter of Rights for People with Dementia and their Carers in Scotland. The second is what people with dementia and their carers, in Scotland, have identified as being important to them and what they want from services. The standards are used in conjunction with “Promoting Excellence: A framework for health and social care staff working with people with dementia and their carers”.

Content, quality and monitoring of care and support

The Regulation of Care (Scotland) Act 2001 creates the legal framework for the National Standards of Care in Scotland and for the Care Inspectorate who are a regulatory body for the registration and inspection all adult, child and independent health and social care services in Scotland. The Care Inspectorate registers care services in Scotland such as care homes, day centres and services that provide care in a person's own home. The Care Inspectorate inspects care services to make sure they are providing quality care as set out in legislation and the National Care Standards. It investigates complaints and has enforcement powers it can use to make sure poor quality services improve. The National Care Standards include standards of care at home and in care homes.

With regard to possible complaints, The Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968 sets out the legal power for Scottish Ministers to require local authorities to establish complaints procedures. All local authorities operate a complaints procedure relating to its social work functions based on Scottish Government guidance issued in 1996. The complaints process has three parts:

1. an informal problem solving stage intended to resolve complaints,

2. unresolved complaints are then investigated by specially designated staff,

3. if a complaint remains unresolved, complainant can ask for an independent Complaints

    Review Committee to consider it.

Promoting well-being and autonomy/Respecting individuality and cultural diversity

The Equality Act 2010 provides the legal framework for promoting equality in Scotland and rest of the UK.  It is intended to simplify, streamline and strengthen the law to give individuals greater protection from unfair discrimination and sets a new standard for those who provide public services to treat everyone, with dignity and respect.

The Act harmonises the current legislation to provide the UK with a new discrimination law which protects individuals from unfair treatment and promotes a fair and more equal society. The Act replaces nine main pieces of legislation covering equal pay, sex/gender discrimination, disability discrimination and employment equality.

Involving people with dementia in decisions about care and support

See the following section for details.

Issues relating to care and support in Scotland’s National Dementia Strategies

The Scottish Government published Scotland’s second, three year, National Dementia Strategy in June 2013. The strategy sets out an ambitious plan for the period 2013 to 2016 and is based key outcomes which emerged from National Dementia Dialogue events run across Scotland in partnership with Alzheimer Scotland during 2012/13. These events brought together a broad range of stakeholders, including people with dementia and carers.  The key priorities identified were:

  • more people with dementia living a good quality life at home for longer,
  • dementia-enabled and dementia-friendly local communities, that contribute to greater awareness of dementia and reduce stigma,
  • timely, accurate diagnosis of dementia,
  • better post-diagnostic support for people with dementia and their families,
  • more people with dementia and their families and carers being involved as equal partners in care throughout the journey of the illness,
  • better respect and promotion of rights in all settings, together with improved compliance with the legal requirements in respect of treatment,
  • people with dementia in hospitals or other institutional settings always being treated with dignity and respect.

Scotland’s second National Dementia Strategy (2013-2016) makes 17 commitments, all of which are in some way, either directly or indirectly, linked to the care and support of people with dementia. These are:

1. To sustain and, where appropriate improve further, dementia diagnosis rates.

2.To transform the availability, consistency and quality of post-diagnostic support by delivering the new post-diagnostic HEAT target.

3.To test and evaluate a range of approaches to providing better integrated care and support on the basis of the 8 Pillars model, centred on a Dementia Practice Coordinator role.

4. Commission Alzheimer Scotland to produce an evidence based policy document outlining the contributions of AHPs to ensuring implementation of the 8-Pillar model.

5. To take further action to support safe and supportive home environments and the importance of the use of adaptations and assistive technology, in maintaining the independence and quality of life of people with dementia and their carers.

6. To take further action to support and promote best practice in advance care planning, the assessment of capacity to consent to treatment and adherence to proper procedures for making decisions for people with dementia who lack capacity.

7. To publish a report on the implementation of the Standards of Care for Dementia in Scotland to date.

8. To continue to improve staff skills and knowledge by working with National Health Service, NHS Education Scotland and Scottish Social Services Council to take forward a second Promoting Excellence training plan across the period of this Strategy.

9. To work with NHS Education Scotland, Scottish Social Services Council, NHS Health Scotland, NHS 24 and Alzheimer Scotland to develop and launch an innovative digital platform for dementia, which will help inform and empower people with dementia and their families and carers in being equal partners in care.

10. To develop and deliver a 3-year National Action Plan to improve care in acute general hospitals.

11. To set out plans for extending the work on quality of care in general hospitals to other hospitals and National Health Service settings.

12. To work with Scottish Care, Scottish Social Services Council, NHS Education Scotland and others to assess the need for, and take further action on, improving service response around care homes, care at home and adult day care services. This will include attention to staff training and support for the implementation of the post-diagnostic HEAT target and the commitment on reducing inappropriate prescribing of psychoactive medication for people diagnosed in care homes.

13. To finalise and implement a national commitment on the prescribing of psychoactive medications, as part of ensuring that such medication is used only where there is no appropriate alternative and where there is clear benefit to the person receiving the medication.

14. To take account of the expectations and experience of people with dementia and their carers in taking forward the work on outcomes for the integration of health and social care.

15. To continue to support research through funding The Scottish Dementia Clinical Research Network and supporting the work of the new Scottish Dementia Research Consortium in its objective to bring together the range of dementia research interests in Scotland and maximise the impact of and funding opportunities for research capacity here.

16. To undertake a brief piece of work focusing on the care pathway for people with dementia in these groups, through diagnosis and support, through treatment and care, taking account of the particular challenges for carers and family members with the objective of identifying what further actions are required to ensure that each of the key improvement areas – diagnosis, post-diagnostic support, care co-ordination requires modification to take account of the needs of different groups.

17. To oversee and ensure progress on the dementia agenda and in implementing this Strategy, we will carry over from the first Strategy an Implementation and Monitoring Group to co-ordinate, support and monitor progress on the other commitments outlined in this Strategy.

With reference to commitment 10, the 3-year National Action Plan sets out 10 key actions which are linked to the implementation of the Standards of Care for Dementia in Scotland in hospitals to be overseen by an expert Dementia Standards in Hospitals Implementation and Monitoring Group. The 10 Actions are:

• Identify a leadership structure within National Health Service Boards to drive and monitor improvements,

• Develop the workforce against the Promoting Excellence knowledge and skills framework,

• Plan and prepare for admission and discharge,

• Develop and embed person-centred assessment and care planning,

• Promote a rights-based and anti-discriminatory culture,

• Develop a safe and therapeutic environment,

• Use evidence-based screening and assessment tools for diagnosis,

• Work as equal partners with families, friends and carers,

• Minimise and respond appropriately to stress and distress,

• Evidence the impact of changes against patient experience and outcomes,

• To set out plans for extending the work on quality of care in general hospitals to other hospitals and NHS settings.

Scotland’s National Dementia Strategy 2013/16 builds on the work of the 2010, in particular the work to improve diagnostic rates and post diagnostic support. From April 2013 the Scottish Government has guaranteed a minimum of one year's post diagnostic support, through a link worker, for people newly diagnosed with dementia including person-centred support plan. This target will be due for delivery by 2015/16. This supports sustained independence within context of strong family and community support and promotes early decision making on future care options as part of person-centred care. The post diagnostic support guarantee is based on Alzheimer Scotland’s 5 Pillar Model of Post Diagnostic Support. The five pillars are:

  1. help to understand the illness and manage symptoms,
  2. support to stay connected to the community,
  3. peer support,
  4. help with future decision-making,
  5. developing a personalised care plan for their future care.

The 2013/16 Strategy also includes a commitment to test Alzheimer Scotland’s 8 Pillar Model of Community Support. This model sets out an integrated and comprehensive, evidence-based approach to supporting people with dementia living at home during the moderate to severe stages of the illness.  Alzheimer Scotland are currently working with the Scottish Government and other key stakeholders to identify four sites to carry forward the Scottish Governments’ commitment to testing the 8 Pillars Model.

Scotland’s National Dementia Strategy sits within a wider policy context which aims to transform and improve health and social care services in Scotland. Other key strands of that work include:

Integration of Health and Social Care

The Scottish Government is taking forward legislation to allow for the local integration of adult and older people’s health and social care services in Scotland; the need to improve the response to dementia is one of the key policy drivers for this work and health boards, local authorities and the voluntary sector are involved in this process. See references section for link to further information.

Reshaping Care for Older People/Change Fund

The Scottish Government is investing £300 million to facilitate changes in the way services are designed and care is delivered, including services for people with dementia. Health and Social Care Partnerships will set out their intentions for the future delivery of care for people with dementia and their carers in their respective planning documents and have the ability to develop plans together through joint commissioning processes.

Carers Strategies

“Caring Together: The Carers Strategy for Scotland 2010-15”, which is underpinned by £98 million of investment between 2008 and 2015, recognises that carers must be seen as equal partners in the delivery of care as their support enables people with dementia to live at home and in their own communities safely, independently and with dignity.

Self-directed Support

Self-directed support is a major reform to the way in which social care and some healthcare services are delivered and gives greater choice and control to individuals, including people with dementia and their carers, to decide how the financial resources are spent, including taking a direct payment, to arrange care and support around the their lives. 

Housing

A Strategy for Housing for Scotland’s Older People: 2012 – 2021 emphasises the role of housing and housing-related support in ‘shifting the balance of are’ towards independent living in the community and reducing the use of institutional care settings.

Palliative Care

Two reports on “Living and Dying Well” (see references section for details) promote the provision of palliative and end-of-life care to all, regardless of diagnosis, and are consistent with, and highly supportive of, improvements in care for people with dementia and their families.

Training

Which social and healthcare professionals provide care and support

The following social and healthcare professionals are involved in the provision of care and support to people with dementia in residential care or living at home.

Social or healthcare professional

Involved in the provision of care and support to people with dementia in residential care or at home

Nursing staff

Yes

Auxiliary staff

Yes

Allied health professionals

Yes

Specialists (e.g. psychiatrists, gerontologists, neurologists)*

No

General practitioners*

Yes (GPs play a key role in referring people with dementia  to the services they need)

Other

Yes (Home Support staff from statutory (local authorities), private and voluntary sector  home care providers)

* Only if they are linked to the provision and organisation of care and support (i.e. not with regard to their role to provide medical treatment).

The type of training that social and healthcare professionals receive

In Scotland, all health and social care staff who work with people with dementia should have some training in dementia care. In accordance with Scotland’s Promoting Excellence framework (see next sub-section), the content of such training should include the following:

  • Specialised knowledge about dementia.
  • Basic/elementary knowledge about dementia.
  • Care and support of people with dementia.
  • Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia.
  • Palliative or end-of-life care of people with dementia.

The level of knowledge covered in each of the above categories is determined by the level of practice of the groups receiving the training.

The assessment of capacity is also of relevance to the type of training received by health and social care staff who work with people with dementia. The Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000 creates the legal framework for any intervention in the property, financial or welfare matters relating to an adult with incapacity in Scotland.  The act sets out fundamental principles which must be taken into account when considering any intervention. The act also defines incapacity.  There is no single mechanism for the assessment of capacity, but the Scottish Government has published “Communication and Assessing Capacity: A guide for social work and healthcare staff”, to support professionals in assessing the capacity of individuals who may come under protection of the Act. The  Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000: “Code of Practice For Practitioners Authorised to Carry Out Medical Treatment or Research Under Part 5 of the Act” and the British  Medical Association’s (BMA), “Medical treatment for adults with incapacity - guidance on ethical and medico-legal issues inScotland”, also provide guidance for medical practitioners on assessment of capacity. Understanding the legal rights and protections of people with dementia are key components of the Promoting Excellence framework and the Standard of Care for Dementia in Scotland, including understanding how the provisions of the Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000 relate to people with dementia. Please see the references section for details of various guides linked to the assessment of capacity.

How the training of social and healthcare professionals is addressed

Scotland’s first national dementia strategy published in June 2010 identified that training was a significant issue for health and social care staff who work with people with dementia.  The 2010 strategy made a commitment to develop a framework which sets out the knowledge, skills and behaviour expected of all health and social care staff working with people with dementia. Under the auspices of the Dementia Programme Board, chaired by Alzheimer Scotland, the National Health Service (NHS) Education for Scotland and the Scottish Social Services Council and other stakeholders, including the Scottish Dementia Working Group and the National Dementia Carers Action Network, developed “Promoting Excellence: A framework for health and social services staff working with people with dementia, their families and carers” to support delivery of the aspirations and change actions outlined in the strategy.

Promoting excellence sets out four levels of practice.  These are the:

1. Dementia Informed Practice Level” which sets out the baseline knowledge and skills required by all staff working in health and social care settings including a person's own home.

2. Dementia Skilled Practice Level” which sets out the knowledge and skills required by all staff that have direct and/or substantial contact with people with dementia and their families and carers.

3. Enhanced Dementia Practice Level” which sets out the knowledge and skills required by health and social services staff that have more regular and intense contact with people with dementia, provide specific interventions, and/or direct/manage care and services.

4. Expertise in Dementia Practice Level” which sets out the knowledge and skills required for health and social care staff who by virtue of their role and practice setting, play an expert specialist role in the care, treatment and support of people with dementia.

The knowledge and skills outlined at each level are constructed in an incremental way. For example, staff operating at the 'Dementia Enhanced Practice' level would also possess the knowledge and skills, attitudes and behaviours described at all preceding levels. Given the scope of the workforce across health and social services this framework does not identify specific health and social services staff roles in relation to the framework domains. Each individual staff member and their employer must take responsibility in ensuring they correctly interpret and apply the content and aspirations of the framework to their role in relation to working with people with dementia, their families and carers.

The development of the framework was informed by a number of activities including:

  • Evidence, best practice guidance and literature reviews.
  • Reviews of existing competency frameworks.
  • Links being made with wider UK Dementia work programmes.
  • Stakeholder consultation and engagement.

The Promoting Excellence framework is underpinned by values and principles that reflect what people with dementia, and their families and carers, in Scotland, have said are most important to them. The framework emphasises the rights of people with dementia and their carers and was developed alongside the development of Standards of Care for Dementia in Scotland led by the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland. The standards the promoting excellence framework are based on The Charter of Rights for People with Dementia and their Carers in Scotland. Please see the references section for details of these documents.

The Promoting Excellence framework is intended for use by individuals, service provider and organisational level, including education and training providers.  This is achieved by assisting:

  • Individual members of staff to fully understand the values, knowledge, skills and behaviours expected of them in delivering excellence in dementia care, support and treatment.
  • Individual staff members, alongside their managers, to identify and explore their strengths and any gaps in skills or knowledge in the role they perform and to address any development needs.
  • Organisations to ensure staff have the necessary knowledge and skills to meet the needs of people with dementia, their families and carers, and to plan development activities to meet the aspirations of excellence in dementia care, support and treatment.
  • Organisations to identify any staff development needs to support the delivery of the Standards of Care for Dementia in Scotland.
  • Education and training providers to inform the content of the education and training they provide and shape the design and delivery of future focused vocational and professional undergraduate and post graduate education and training.
  • People with dementia, their families and carers to ensure they are aware of, and can exercise their rights and entitlements to excellence in their care, support and treatment throughout the illness and in any setting.

Support for informal carers

There are several provisions relating to carers in Scotland. These are not specific to, but do include, those who care for someone with dementia.

Two key pieces of legislation make provisions for carers in Scotland:

  • Social Work Scotland Act 1968 (the duties relating to carers assessment are inserted by the Community Care & Health (Scotland) Act 2002)
  • The Community Care & Health (Scotland) Act 2002

The Community Care & Health (Scotland) Act 2002 creates the following rights and duties relating to carers.

  • The right of carers to ask for a “carers assessment” of their needs as carers,
  • A duty on local authorities to inform carers of their right to an assessment,
  • A duty on local authorities to take into account carers’ views when putting together a community care package,
  • Rights to assessment for parent carers, and young people under 16,
  • A duty on NHS Boards to produce Carer Information Strategies, detailing how they will provide information to carers, including their right to an assessment.

These rights and duties are underpinned by the key principle that local authorities, the NHS and other support agencies should recognise and treat carers as key partners in providing care. A carer’s assessment should consider whether the amount of care given by a carer is given by choice, the impact of care on the health of the carer, on his/her needs, work, relationships and social life. The carer also has the right to be involved in local authority decision making relating to the care of the person s/he supports.

In 2010, the Scottish Government publishedCaring Together: The Carers Strategy for Scotland 2010-15. Amongst its aims, the Carers Strategy seeks to ensure that carers have the ability to combine caring responsibilities with work, social, leisure and learning opportunities and retain a life outside of caring, and to be involved in planning and shaping the services required for the service user and the support for themselves. Issues such as respite, training, consultation/involvement in care decisions, counselling/support and case management are all covered in this documents which sets out plans for delivering on the following key issues:

  • Prioritising support to carers,
  • Equality issues for carers,
  • Carers rights,
  • Carer involvement in planning, shaping and delivering services and support,
  • Identification of carers,
  • Carers assessments (Carer Support Plans),
  • Types of support,
  • Information and advice,
  • Carer health and well-being,
  • Short breaks (respite),
  • Carer training and education,
  • Housing and housing support,
  • Use of assistive technology,
  • Advocacy support,
  • Employment and skills,
  • Tackling poverty among carers: Financial Inclusion,

National Alzheimer Association

Alzheimer Scotland provides the following services and support.

Helpline

x

Information activities (newsletters, publications)

x

Website

x

Awareness campaigns

x

Legal advice

 

Care coordination/Case management

x

Home help (cleaning, cooking, shopping)

x

Home care (personal hygiene, medication)

x

Incontinence help

 

Assistive technologies / ICT solutions

x

Tele Alarm

 

Adaptations to the home

 

Meals on wheels

 

Counselling

x

Support groups for people with dementia

x

Alzheimer cafes

x

Respite care at home

x

Holidays for carers

x

Training for carers

x

Support groups for carers

x

Day care

x

Residential/Nursing home care

 

Palliative care

x

References

Alzheimer Europe (2009).2006-2008 European Collaboration on Dementia (EuroCoDe). Alzheimer Europe. Available at: http://www.alzheimer-europe.org/Alzheimer-Europe/Our-work/Completed-AE-projects/2006-2008-EuroCoDe

Alzheimer Scotland (2009). The Charter of Rights for People with Dementia and their Carers in Scotland. Alzheimer Scotland. Available at: http://www.dementiarights.org/charter-of-rights/

British Medical Association’s (BMA) (2009), Medical treatment for adults with incapacity - guidance on ethical and medico-legal issues in Scotland. BMA. Available at: http://bma.org.uk/practical-support-at-work/ethics/mental-capacity-scotland

Harvey, R. (1998).Young onset dementia: epidemiology, clinical symptoms, family burden, support and outcome.Imperial College London

ISD Scotland (2012). Information Services Division. ISD. Accessible at: http://www.isdscotland.org/

Lithgow, S. et al. (2012). Estimating the prevalence of dementia: cognitive screening in Glasgow nursing homes.International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry,27, 785-791

The Scottish Government (2002). The Community Care & Health (Scotland) Act 2002. The Stationery Office Limited. Available at: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/asp/2002/5/part/1/crossheading/carers

The Scottish Government (2008). Living and Dying Well: A National Action Plan for Palliative and End of Life Care. The Scottish Government. Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/ 10/01091608/0

The Scottish Government (2008). Communication and Assessing Capacity: A guide for social work and healthcare staff.The Scottish Government. Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/02/01151101/2

The Scottish Government (2010). Caring Together: The Carers Strategy for Scotland 2010-15.The Scottish Government. Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/07/23153304/0

The Scottish Government (2010). The Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000: Code of Practice For Practitioners Authorised to Carry Out Medical Treatment or Research Under Part 5 of the Act. The Scottish Government. Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/10/20153801/1

The Scottish Government (2011). A Strategy for Housing for Scotland’s Older People: 2012 – 2021. The Scottish Government. Available at http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/12/16091323/0

The Scottish Government (2011).Living and Dying Well: Building on Progress.The Scottish Government.Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/01/27090834/0

The Scottish Government (2011). The Promoting Excellence framework. The Scottish Government. Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/05/31085332/0

The Scottish Government (2011).The Standards of Care for Dementia in Scotland. The Scottish Government. Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/05/31085414/0

The Scottish Government (2013).Scotland’s National Dementia Strategy 2013-2016. The Scottish Government. Available at:

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Health/Services/Mental-Health/Dementia/ Dementia Strategy1316

The Scottish Government (2013). Integration of Adult Health and Social Care. The Scottish Government. Accessible at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Health/Policy/Adult-Health-SocialCare-Integration

Acknowledgements

Jim Pearson, Alzheimer Scotland, Deputy Director of Policy

 

 
 

Last Updated: Tuesday 25 February 2014

 

 
  • Acknowledgements

    The above information was published in the 2013 Dementia in Europe Yearbook as part of Alzheimer Europe's 2013 Work Plan which received funding from the European Union in the framework of the Health Programme.
  • European Union
 
 

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