Basket | Login | Register

 
 
 
 

Annual Report 2006

Annual Reports


Preface

1906 was the year that Alois Alzheimer first described the symptoms of a disease that ultimately came to bear his name and Alzheimer associations across Europe used the commemoration of the centenary of this discovery to make an inventory of the achievements over the preceding 100 years.

Alzheimer Europe dedicated its 16th Annual Conference to providing an overview of some significant scientific breakthroughs with regard to the causes, genetics, diagnosis and treatment of dementia. Equally important though, we looked at the development of care services, the growing role of Alzheimer associations and the improvements in our understanding of the impact and experience of dementia.

For me as the chairperson of Alzheimer Europe, 2006 also provided the perfect opportunity to assess the state of development of our own organisation and the contributions it has made over the past years.

As you will see from this Annual Report, 2006 was indeed a very productive year for the organisation. Financially, it was the best year to date with an income of €763.798 which represents more than a doubling of our income compared to 2005 (€362.543). A major portion of this increase can of course be explained by our successful project application under the Commission public health programme and the acceptance of our project “EuroCoDe – European Collaboration on Dementia

This European project featured of course very prominently in our activities and thanks to the project, we were able to publish the very first edition of our “Dementia in Europe Yearbook”. The 2006 edition provided an estimate of the number of people with dementia in 31 European countries, as well as a clear overview of the very different national systems for the reimbursement of anti-dementia and the provision of home care.

This publication was very warmly welcomed by Commissioner Kyprianou and by Members of the European Parliament when we launched the Yearbook officially on 7 November 2006. We were delighted to hear that the Commission had high expectations from this project and that they would consider the development of a Commission Communication on Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia after the successful completion of our project in 2008. What a significant medium term objective to work towards and what great encouragement for all our partners involved in the project!

Alzheimer Europe also passed a significant milestone towards a greater recognition of dementia by policy makers. At our Annual General Meeting in Paris, our member organisations unanimously adopted a veritable call for action to European and national policy makers to make dementia a European public health priority and we were delighted to hear Philippe Bas, French Minister for Social Affairs and the Elderly give the full support of the French government to the priorities outlined in our Paris Declaration. This Declaration has in the meantime been signed by over 100 policy makers clearly showing that Alzheimer Europe and its member organisations have the possibility and means to reach out and convince policy makers of the significant impact of dementia on all European societies and public health policies.

In any normal year, these two significant achievements would be enough to make any European organisation proud. But Alzheimer Europe was active in many other areas and I would just like to single out our Carers’ Survey which we conducted in partnership with Lundbeck, our new publication on advance directives and our concerted action to defend the access of people with dementia to anti-dementia drugs threatened by the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the United Kingdom as other examples of the breadth of actions undertaken by our organisation.

As Chairperson of the organisation, I am truly proud of these achievements and look forward with full confidence to the continued growth of Alzheimer Europe. Of course, none of this would have been possible without the vision and commitment of our dedicated staff, our Executive Director, Jean Georges, our EU Public Affairs Officer, Annette Dumas, our Information Officer, Dianne Gove and our Communication Officer, Sandrine Lavallé and I would like to take this opportunity to give them my heartfelt thanks.

Similarly, the best people with the best ideas can only do as much as the financial situation allows and without the continued support of our sponsors and the identification of new ones, our achievements would be a lot less remarkable. I would therefore like to thank all the supporters of Alzheimer Europe who shared my confidence in the organisation and agreed to support our activities.

In particular, I would like to single out the European Commission and its support of our EuroCoDe project, as well as our Luxembourg member organisation for seconding our Executive Director and providing rent free offices to the organisation. My thanks also go to Lundbeck, Janssen-Cilag, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis, Fondation Médéric Alzheimer, Numico and Merck Sharp & Dohme.

Maurice O’Connell
Chairperson of Alzheimer Europe


Executive Summary

In 2006, Alzheimer Europe

  • Successfully increased its public affairs role and appointed a EU public affairs officer who had regular contacts with representatives of the different European institutions,
  • Adopted the Paris Declaration on the political priorities of the European Alzheimer movement which provided the start of a campaign towards European and national policy makers to make dementia a European public health priority,
  • Received the support of Philippe Bas, French Minister for Social Affairs and the Elderly for the political priorities contained in the Paris Declaration as well as individual endorsements of over 100 European national policy makers,
  • Collaborated on various working groups set up by the European Commission, such as the Task Force on Major and Chronic Conditions, the Working Party on Morbidity and Mortality and the Working Group on Relative Effectiveness of the Pharmaceutical Forum,
  • Contributed to the Commission consultation on its Transparency Initiative and adopted a position paper on “information to patients” for the discussions of the Pharmaceutical Forum,
  • Organised a well attended lunch-debate on Alzheimer’s disease in the European Parliament on 7 November,
  • Launched its first “Dementia in Europe Yearbook” with information on the prevalence of dementia, the reimbursement of anti-dementia drugs and the home care systems in 31 European countries,
  • Progressed with the development of its Parliamentary Friends of Alzheimer Europe and garnered the support of 17 Members of the European Parliament for this initiative,
  • Launched a new website (www.dementia-in-europe.eu) dedicated to the presentation of the Paris Declaration and the information of the Dementia in Europe Yearbook,
  • Was accredited by the European Medicines Agency as a patient organisation complying with the agency’s strict rules on transparency, democracy and legitimacy,
  • Continued its collaboration with the European Medicines Agency through its membership on the EMEA Management Board and the Working Group with Patient Organisations,
  • Attended the quarterly meetings of NGO’s with consultative status at the Council of Europe,
  • Involved its national member organisations in the different activities of the association,
  • Continued the implementation of its communication strategy and published a quarterly newsletter with information on scientific breakthroughs, relevant European developments and the activities of the organisations and its members,
  • Further developed its website which attracted close to 620,000 visitors (compared to 240,000 in 2005),
  • Organised the well attended 16th Alzheimer Europe Conference in Paris from 29 June to 1 July,
  • Carried out a survey on the reimbursement systems of anti-dementia drugs in 31 European countries and developed a further survey on the social support provided by governments to people with dementia and their carers,
  • Reviewed some of the information on the legal protection of people with dementia obtained in its earlier Lawnet project,
  • Developed a draft position on stem cell research and carried out a consultation of its members on this subject,
  • Adopted a position on the disclosure of a diagnosis of dementia,
  • Coordinated a response to the NICE recommendations backed by over 100 associations and individuals calling on NICE to revise its recommendations and allow patients at all stages of the illness to have access to drug treatments,
  • Developed a closer collaboration with and attended the conferences of the European Association of Geriatric Psychiatry and the European Federation of Neurological Societies,
  • Continued its active involvement in the European Patients’ Forum and saw its Executive Director elected as the Vice-Chairperson of the organisation,
  • Successfully completed the contract negotiations with the European Commission for its project “EuroCoDe – European Collaboration on Dementia” bringing together 34 centres and organisations from across Europe and organised two meetings of the different working groups of the project, as well as a meeting of the steering committee,
  • Coordinated the activities of the EuroCoDe project with the different working groups carrying out an extensive literature search and an analysis of existing guidelines in the areas of social support systems, diagnosis and treatment, psycho-social interventions, prevalence, the socio-economic cost of dementia and prevention and risk factors,
  • Partnered with Lundbeck for the development of a survey on carers’ needs which was conducted by the AE member organisations in France, Germany, Poland, Scotland and Spain which revealed the impact of dementia on carers, the lack of information provided at the time of diagnosis, the scarcity of care services and the significant financial contributions of carers to the care of people with dementia,
  • Collaborated in the Task Force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies for the revision of its guidelines on the management of dementia and ensured that the need for early referral of diagnosed patients and their carers to Alzheimer associations was included in the revised guidelines,
  • Published a detailed report on the findings of its project on advance directives which included a report on the literature review, on overview of the legal status of advance directives in some European countries and the organisation’s position on the use of advance directives by people with dementia,
  • Developed a guide for people with dementia and their carers at the onset of the disease entitled “After diagnosis – what next?” which was translated into Greek and Italian and published in Greek,
  • Finalised its review of the home care systems in Europe and included national reports on the organisation of home care in 31 European countries in the Dementia in Europe Yearbook and the new website of the organisation (www.dementia-in-europe.eu),
  • Saw the publication of the third edition of its German Care Manual and the second edition of the Portuguese version,
  • Increased its membership by welcoming the Maltese and Bulgarian organisations as full and provisional members respectively,
  • Diversified its funding sources and enlarged the circle of sponsors of the organisation,
  • Developed a new concept for Alzheimer Europe conferences.

Our strategic objectives

The new strategic plan of Alzheimer Europe provides a clear mission statement for the activities of the organisation and defines this mission as changing perceptions, policy and practice in order to improve the access by people with dementia and their carers to treatment options and care services.

The strategic plan furthermore defines six key objectives for the organisation: representing the interests of people with dementia and their carers, involving and supporting national Alzheimer associations, improving the information exchange between Alzheimer Europe, its members and European structures, promoting best practice through the development of comparative surveys, developing policy statements and developing strategic partnerships.

Representing the interests of people with dementia and their carers

Alzheimer Europe strengthened its contacts with the European institutions through the appointment of Annette Dumas, as the EU public affairs officer who was given the task of maintaining regular contact with members of the European Parliament and the European Commission.

European Commission

As the project leader of “EuroCoDe – European Collaboration on Dementia “, Alzheimer Europe became a member of the European Commission Task Force on Major and Chronic conditions and the Working Party on Morbidity and Mortality. Jean Georges also represented the European Patients’ Forum in a working group on relative effectiveness set up by the European Commission in the framework of the European Pharmaceutical Forum.

Alzheimer Europe also contributed directly to a number of consultations organised by the European Commission. In September, the organisation gave its support to the Transparency Initiative of Commissioner Kallas and welcomed the proposal to introduce strict criteria on transparency and legitimacy for European organisations lobbying the different European institutions. In September, Alzheimer Europe also contributed to the discussions on “information to patients” within the Pharmaceutical Forum set up by the European Commission.

European Parliament

On 7 November 2006 on the occasion of the centenary of Alois Alzheimer’s discovery, Alzheimer Europe organised a lunch-debate in the European Parliament in Brussels. The event which was hosted by Astrid Lulling, MEP (Luxembourg), was very well attended with over 20 participants from different European institutions, including Georgina Georgiou from the Cabinet of Commissioner Markos Kyprianou, 12 Members of the European Parliament and a further 6 assistants of other MEPs who were unable to attend the meeting themselves.

At the meeting, Alzheimer Europe presented the first edition of its “Dementia in Europe Yearbook” which contains information on the prevalence of dementia in Europe, the reimbursement of anti-dementia drugs and the provision of home care in 31 European countries (27 EU Member States and Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Turkey).

Alzheimer Europe also progressed with the development of its group of Parliamentary Friends of the organisation and in 2006, this initiative received the support of 17 Members of the European Parliament: Henrik Lax, Riitta Myller and Kyösti Virrankoski (Finland), Angelika Niebler, Thomas Ulmer and Anja Weisgerber (Germany), Brian Crowley and Kathy Sinnott (Ireland), Alessandro Battilocchio (Italy), Astrid Lulling (Luxembourg), Joseph Muscat (Malta), Jan Tadeusz Masiel (Poland), Miroslav Mikolasik (Slovakia), Charlotte Cederschiöld (Sweden), Corien Wortmann-Kool (Netherlands) John Bowis and Catherine Stihler (United Kingdom).

European Medicines Evaluations Agency

Alzheimer Europe continued its collaboration in the activities of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) through the membership of its Executive Director in the EMEA Management Board and his involvement in the Working Group with Patient and Consumer Organisations. The working group continued its focus on improving patient involvement in such areas as the provision of information on medicines to patients as well as pharmacovigilance and the reporting of adverse drug reactions.

On 3 February 2006, Alzheimer Europe was informed by the EMEA services that the organisation complies with the strict criteria of democracy, representation, transparency and legitimacy required of patient organisations and Alzheimer Europe was this accepted as one of the first organisations to be accredited by EMEA to be involved in EMEA activities.

Council of Europe

Besides the institutions of the European Union, Alzheimer Europe also continued its collaboration with the Council of Europe. As an organisation with consultative status, Alzheimer Europe took part in the quarterly meetings of NGOs affiliated to the Council of Europe and participated in the meetings of organisations with an interest in health.

Involving and supporting national Alzheimer associations

National member organisations were involved in all the projects of the organisation. The development of a new strategic plan and priorities for 2007 was achieved after full consultation of Alzheimer Europe’s members. Similarly, the home care and reimbursement reports would have been impossible to complete without the active participation of AE members.

Alzheimer Europe also responded to the review of NICE’s recommendations for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, a position which was backed by all member organisations. The Alzheimer Europe conference was well attended by members and the very good attendance at the Annual General Meeting and positive feedback obtained gave an indication of the high level of satisfaction of the current direction of the organisation. The centenary event in the European Parliament was also attended by a number of AE members who had the opportunity to meet with MEPs from their own country.

Improving the information exchange between AE, its members and European structures

In line with its communication strategy adopted in 2004, Alzheimer Europe continued to gather information on scientific developments and published them in a quarterly e-mail newsletter together with information on its activities and those of its member organisations, as well as on relevant European developments.

Alzheimer Europe Website

The Alzheimer Europe website continues to be a useful source of information for people interested in finding out more about Alzheimer Europe and the care and treatment of people with dementia. Between 2005 and 2006, the number of visitors more than doubled with over 50,000 persons visiting the Alzheimer Europe website every month.

 

Visitors 2006

Visitors 2005

January

35,545

13,208

February

39,671

15,681

March

66,306

17,391

April

82,362

15,835

May

81,633

13,540

June

49,577

16,543

July

53,859

21,357

August

33,449

15,469

September

45,370

22,298

October

40,821

27,095

November

44,779

31,623

December

46,601

29,221

TOTAL

619,973

239,261

Average

51,664

19,938

Alzheimer Europe regularly updated its website with information on its latest activities, the projects of its member organisations, research findings and the latest European developments.

On 7 November 2006, Alzheimer Europe launched a new website (www.dementia-in-europe.eu) which is dedicated to the Paris Declaration on the political priorities of the European Alzheimer movement. The website provides information on the prevalence of dementia and an overview of the reimbursement systems and the provision of home care in 31 European countries. Furthermore, the website provides a list of the various policy makers who gave their support to the Alzheimer Europe campaign to make dementia a European public health priority.

16th Annual Conference in Paris, France

Alzheimer Europe organised its 16th Annual Conference in Paris from 29 June to 1 July. As in previous years, the conference was an ideal opportunity for representatives of Alzheimer associations to meet and exchange information and experience. The conference which was organised under the auspices of the President of the French Republic was attended by some 400 delegates from a wide range of European countries and with different professional backgrounds. The conference was also the setting for the organisation adopting its Paris Declaration on the political priorities of the European Alzheimer movement which outlines a clear call for action to European and national policy makers to make Alzheimer’s disease a European public health priority.

Promoting best practice through the development of comparative surveys

In order to support its members’ lobbying activities to improve the access of people with dementia and their carers to a high level of care services and treatment options, Alzheimer Europe included a work package on social support systems in its European project “European Collaboration on Dementia”. The project will aim at analysing the support provided by governments to people with dementia and their carers with a view of identifying best practices in this field.

As a first step, Alzheimer Europe carried out a survey of the reimbursement systems for the existing anti-dementia drugs which was published in the Dementia in Europe Yearbook. Furthermore, the more general survey on social support systems was developed by the European project working group and was piloted amongst some of Alzheimer Europe’s member organisations.

Finally, Alzheimer Europe also started a review of the work it carried out under its Lawnet project which looked at the legal protection of people with dementia in the then 15 Member States of the European Union. Efforts were undertaken to identify pertinent laws from the new Member States of the European Union.

Developing policy statements

In 2006, Alzheimer Europe contributed to the European discussions on “information to patients” and the European Commission Transparency Initiative. Both positions were adopted by the Alzheimer Europe Board.

A draft position on stem cell research was approved by the Board to be sent out for full consultation to member organisations, but the adoption of a final position was postponed till 2007 to allow for further consultation within and with national member organisations.

A position on the disclosure of a diagnosis was adopted by the Board at its November meeting. On 13 February 2006, Alzheimer Europe called on the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to revise its preliminary recommendations for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and allow patients at all stages of the illness to have access to drug treatments. Backed by over 100 associations and experts in the dementia field from 35 countries, Alzheimer Europe questioned the discriminatory nature of the NICE recommendations which effectively disbarred English and Welsh people with Alzheimer’s disease from treatment options available under the national health systems of other European countries.

Developing strategic partnerships

Alzheimer Europe was able to involve other European networks in its various activities and in particular the EuroCoDe project. The involvement of Alzheimer Europe in the task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) for the review of its guidelines also shows the greater recognition of Alzheimer Europe and the interest of European medical and scientific organisations to work more closely with the association. Alzheimer Europe also participated in the 2006 conferences of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) and the European Association of Geriatric Psychiatry (EAGP).

Alzheimer Europe also continued its collaboration with other European patient and carer organisations through its active membership in the European Patients’ Forum (EPF). In 2006, Jean Georges, Executive Director of Alzheimer Europe was re-elected to the Executive Committee of the European Patients’ Forum and appointed as its Vice-President.


Alzheimer Europe Projects

European Collaboration on Dementia

In 2005, Alzheimer Europe was informed by the European Commission that its project “European Collaboration on Dementia” had been accepted for funding under the Public Health Programme. The project aims on the one hand at setting up a European network of all the actors involved in dementia research, treatment and care in Europe and on the other hand at developing consensual guidelines on diagnosis and treatment, psycho-social interventions, prevalence rates, risk factors and prevention, the socio-economic impact of dementia and social support systems.

The working groups of the different work package leaders met twice in 2006 and the work package leaders gave an overview of their work plan and methodology to the members of the steering committee who met in June in the framework of the Alzheimer Europe conference. All working groups concentrated on identifying existing guidelines in their respective fields and carried out an extensive search and analysis of the available literature.

In the framework of its project, Alzheimer Europe published its first “Dementia in Europe Yearbook” with information on the prevalence of dementia, the reimbursement systems for anti-dementia drugs and the home care support systems in 31 European countries. Alzheimer Europe was delighted that this new publication was prefaced by EU Commissioner Kyprianou, the Chair of the EP Committee for Public Health Florenz and Finnish Minister for Social Services Hyssälä who was the acting President of the European Council of Health Ministers.

The project brings together a wide range of actors and centres such as:

  • Alzheimer’s Disease International, European Alzheimer’s Disease Consortium, European Association of Geriatric Psychiatry, European Federation of Neurological Societies, Interdem, International Association of Gerontology – European Region and North Sea Dementia Research Group in the Steering Committee of the project,
  • University of Stirling and the Alzheimer associations of Finland, Germany, Portugal and Romania in the work package on social support systems,
  • Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group at the University of Oxford, University Medical Centre of Amsterdam, National Institute of Psychiatry (Budapest), the Heinrich-Heine Universität and the University La Sapienza of Rome in the work package on diagnosis and treatment,
  • University Medical Centre St. Radboud, University of Hull, University of Wales (Bangor), Hôpital Broca and Fundación Intras in the work package on psycho-social interventions,
  • European Alzheimer’s Disease Consortium at the University Hospital of Toulouse, Technische Universität München, Wroclaw Medical University and Karolinska Institutet in the work package on prevalence,

Alzheimer Europe Campaign “Make dementia a European public health priority”

At its Annual Meeting in Paris on 29 June, Alzheimer Europe and its member organisations unanimously adopted the Paris Declaration on the political priorities of the European Alzheimer movement.

This declaration asks European and national policy makers to:

  • Make Alzheimer’s disease a public health priority by developing national and European action programmes on Alzheimer’s disease and by increasing the funding of research into the causes, prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias,
  • Promote the early diagnosis of the disease by developing awareness campaigns on Alzheimer’s disease and making dementia a compulsory part of medical training,
  • Improve the quality of life of people with dementia and their carers through the development of support and respite services and increased financial support for these services,
  • Promote the autonomy and dignity of people with dementia through systematic information of people diagnosed, the recognition of advance directives and improvements to existing guardianship systems.

At the end of the three day conference in Paris, Maurice O’Connell, chairperson of Alzheimer Europe and Arlette Meyrieux, chairperson of the French Alzheimer’s association signed the declaration on behalf of the delegates and formally presented it to Philippe Bas, Minister for Social Welfare, the Elderly, the Disabled and the Family. In his response, the Minister gave the full support of the French government to the outlined priorities and thanked Alzheimer associations for their important contribution to the ongoing discussions in France and throughout Europe.

Alzheimer Europe proceeded to present the Declaration to European policy makers at a meeting in the European Parliament on 7 November and developed a new website dedicated to the Declaration. By the end of 2006, over 100 policy makers had given their support to the political priorities outlined by Alzheimer Europe.

European Carers’ Survey

In 2005, Alzheimer Europe in collaboration with Lundbeck coordinated a survey on carers’ needs with its member organisations in France, Germany, Poland, Scotland and Spain. The field work was carried out in December 2005 and January 2007 and each participating organisation reached its target of 200 returned questionnaires.

A report with the findings was presented at the Alzheimer Europe conference and was launched formally on the occasion of World Alzheimer’s Day on 21 September.

The findings revealed that half of carers spend at least 10 hours per day looking after their loved one. Half felt that they had received inadequate information at diagnosis: four out of five wanted more information on help and support services – only two out of five were informed about the existence of an Alzheimer association – and half wanted more information on drug treatments, Perhaps most concerning was the fact that more than half of carers do not have access to services such as home care, day care, or residential/nursing care and when these services are available, many carers have to pay themselves.

Ultimately, the survey showed that only 17% of carers considered that the level of care for the elderly in their country is good.

Finalisation of business plan programmes

The previous business plan of Alzheimer Europe covered the period of 2003-2006 and set the following objectives for the organisation:

  • Ensuring that people with dementia and their carers are referred to Alzheimer associations at the time of diagnosis,
  • Promote the autonomy of people with dementia through the recognition of advance directives,
  • Improve the support and counselling of carers of people with dementia at the onset of the disease,
  • Promote quality of care at home.

Alzheimer associations

In 2006, Alzheimer Europe developed an extensive position on the disclosure of diagnosis in which it presented its views on the need for people diagnosed to be informed of their diagnosis, the importance of early referral to Alzheimer associations and advice on the communication of the diagnosis and the information needs of people with dementia and their carers.

The same year, the European Federation of Neurological Societies published its new guidelines for the diagnosis and management of dementia. Referral of newly diagnosed patients and their carers to Alzheimer associations was included as a good practice point in these guidelines, which responded clearly to the business plan priority of Alzheimer Europe to ensure such a referral.

Advance directives

The position on advance directives which Alzheimer Europe adopted in 2005 was included in the “Dementia in Europe Yearbook” which was sent to European policy makers and other European organisations active in the field of dementia.

Furthermore, Alzheimer Europe published a full report with background information on the use of advance directives by people with dementia resulting from a literature search and a survey of the legal status of such advance directives.

Support of people with dementia and their carers at the onset of the disease

Alzheimer Europe developed a guide for people with dementia and their carers to respond to the immediate questions they may have after hearing a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia.

This guide was approved at the Annual General Meeting in Paris and welcomed as an important tool to provide better information for both people with dementia and their carers at the start of their patient journey.

In 2006, the guide entitled “After diagnosis – What next?” was translated into Italian and Greek and the Greek edition of the Guide was also published in 2006.

Quality of care at home

Alzheimer Europe finalised its survey of the home care systems in a number of European countries. The report was circulated for final corrections to all of Alzheimer Europe’s member organisations in 2006 and approved by the Alzheimer Europe Board. The national reports were included in the “Dementia in Europe Yearbook” and included on the new website of Alzheimer Europe (http://www.dementia-in-europe.eu).


Other activities

Alzheimer Europe Publications

Apart from the Dementia in Europe Yearbook, the report on advance directives and the report on the Carers’ survey mentioned above, Alzheimer Europe was glad to see the Greek Alzheimer’s association translate and publish the AE Guide “After diagnosis – what next?”

2006 also saw the publication of the third edition of the Alzheimer Europe Care Manual in German and the second edition of the Care Manual in Portuguese.

Finally, Annette Dumas and Sabine Henry contributed an article on “Alzheimer’s disease: towards a European approach. Who is taking up the challenge” to Actus Gériatrie.

Membership development

Alzheimer Europe continued to network informally with Alzheimer associations in a number of European countries which are not currently members of the organisation. The contacts with the Maltese and Bulgarian associations were particularly useful in that they resulted in both member organisations participating in AE activities and being accepted as full and provisional member respectively.

Contacts with the Slovenian Alzheimer’s organisation have also progressed and the organisation expressed an interest in becoming a member of the organisation.

Fundraising

Alzheimer Europe was able to enlarge its circle of corporate sponsors in 2006 by receiving funding from GlaxoSmithKline, Merck Sharp & Dohme and Novartis. Also, the organisation was able to attract non-pharmaceutical funding from Fondation Médéric Alzheimer and Numico. In 2006, the Alzheimer Europe Board also adopted a new sponsorship policy to be implemented in 2007 and the following years.

Conference concept

A new conference concept was prepared and discussed with the Board. This document which clarifies the responsibilities of the host organisation and Alzheimer Europe was approved by the Annual General Meeting in Paris and the Board adopted new Conference Guidelines at its meeting in November 2006. The new guidelines will ensure a greater collaboration between Alzheimer Europe and the host organisation, as well as a due compensation of the services provided by Alzheimer Europe for the organisation of the annual conferences. The new concept will be applicable from the 2009 Alzheimer Europe conference onwards.

 

 
 

Last Updated: mardi 14 juillet 2009

 

 
 

Options

  • Send this page to a friend